Pure Experience

"I suddenly realize that at last after more than seventy years of looking I see things as they are - what a phrase, "as they are" - and not, as in all past years, wrapped in concepts, e.g. man, woman, flowers, trees.  I see them now as islands of black and white that move, or spots of color making a herbaceous border or a garden of flowers. [...] If the adult gives oneself over to the pure sensation, then he [she] experiences a fusion of pleasure and sensory quality which probably approximates the infantile experience... The emphasis [of my looking] is not on any object but entirely on feeling and sensation."

Joseph Lyons wrote this in 1974, in his book "Experience: an Introduction to a Personal Psychology."

We don't have to wait until we are seventy or older to suddenly discover this capacity in ourselves.  This non-conceptual way of seeing reality "as it is" is available more or less on demand, with a bit of practice.  

What's the formula?  What's the method?  The process of getting there is not an easy one to describe.  To put it simply (and, thus, to run the risk of great oversimplification), you have to practice flowing with sensation and not getting caught up in the interpretive, labeling eddies of your mindstream.